It’s a Freakin’ Lie

I’ve uncovered a truth to one of the biggest lies perpetuated by man. The lie is: if something good happens then something bad must happen to offset it. Not only is this the biggest crock of shit that I’ve ever heard, the fact that no one has written about it tells me that perhaps no one has given it sufficient thought–until now.

The best way for me to explain this will require you to search your memory. I want you to think back to when you were a kid. Think back to the fun you had with your friends. Think back to how you couldn’t wait to see them every day. Remember all the excitement you felt when playing games with them, going to events, roller skating, swimming in the lake, just having fun. Back then, even if you had a fight with a friend, you still couldn’t wait to get up and go have fun with your friends. Even if you fell while roller skating and hurt your knee, you still couldn’t wait to go out with your friends. Even if you had a cold or flu, you still wanted to play with your friends. There was no stopping you from being outdoors and having fun with your friends. Those days and those times were the best. We didn’t know about fears. We didn’t know about negativities. We only knew that we wanted to have fun, and we let nothing hold us down. We didn’t know things such as: well, if today is a great day then that must mean tomorrow will be a bad day because that’s how life works. HELL NO! We did not know of such things. No one told us of such things. We didn’t have the belief system of such things. And that’s why we were happy. We lived for just being who were were. We lived for the moment. We had one-track minds that said, I want to play! We didn’t go home at the end of our day and say, “Shit, I had a great day. I sure hope I don’t have a messed up day tomorrow.”

We didn’t say these things. We didn’t think these things. Therefore, we lived each day having fun, blowing off the bad parts, not knowing that they were bad parts, and just did what we were born to do. All our days were good days. Even bad days were good days. We did not differentiate. We didn’t know to differentiate. Therefore, we were happy. We didn’t sabotage ourselves with the lie that states all good days must be offset with bad days.

When we were kids, we had fun. We went to bed with fun on our minds. We woke up with fun on our minds. We created fun. We played various games which required the use of our imaginations. We were kings and queens and warriors and martians and supermodels, and astronauts. We played and pretended and for us, life was grand. We attracted fun every single day, and we did this because we didn’t know to do different.

Enter our early twenties . . .

As we got older and took on more responsibilities, our well-meaning parents tried to instill values that would protect and benefit us. Their values were taught to them by their parents, which eventually turned into their own beliefs, which then became a life condition for them which attracted all situations that validated their core beliefs. Our well-meaning parents wanted to instill these core beliefs into us in order to benefit us down the road.

They told us things such as: don’t get your hopes up because if things don’t work out, you’ll end up heart broken and disappointed. They told us that in order to appreciate the good the bad has to happen. They told us that if we keep a happy perspective then people will think we’re pushovers and try to use us. It was one well-meaning lie after another which then became our beliefs. It ruined us.

As an adult, did you ever have a great day then suddenly catch yourself thinking: this is too good to be true? Something bad is going to happen. Did you ever feel afraid to feel good because you were afraid of jinxing yourself? Did you ever think that if you had a great day then a bad day will follow because that’s the way of the world?
If you’ve thought these things, I’m here to tell you they are nothing but lies perpetuated from people who were learning it from their ancestors.

The truth is: we are born with the knowledge that we can overcome anything through the use of our minds, and we are supposed to use this to our advantage. We are to keep the mind of a child in order to let the drama roll off our shoulders so that we can look forward to another day. If what I’m saying isn’t true then children wouldn’t be able to play with joy and freedom of expression. If what I’m saying isn’t true, then children would be neurotic messes at the age of five. The average child lives their life in creative bliss. They do not know to worry about having bad days. This is something that GETS LEARNED DOWN THE ROAD. It’s a lie and it can be stopped right now.

Why would you want to stop this line of thinking?

Here’s an example which will get my point across. Let’s say you had a job interview and it went extremely well. But after leaving the interview and not hearing back from the interviewer for a couple of days, you begin to panic. You begin to think: I knew it went too well. I knew I shouldn’t have been so happy. I never should have told all my friends that the job was in the bag. Does this sound familiar?

If you take a child or youngster to the park and they get into a fight with another kid, you don’t hear them saying: I knew I shouldn’t have gone to the park today. Now look at what happened.

Do you see what I mean? If we attach a negative connotation to something we deemed good, then we most likely will attract that negative connotation. Why is that negative connotation there in the first place? Because we learned it. It’s not inherent. It was observed by us and then became our way of life.

It’s all a lie. We don’t want to attach a negative feeling to something good. That is called sabotage. We want to keep the mind of a child and let the good feeling fester and bubble-up in our hearts and minds. We want to keep it because if we do, we will attract more good things. If we could keep the mind of a child when something not so good happens, we can let that not so good incident simply roll off our shoulders and still be happy. We need to know this.

We need to search our hearts and let this be understood. In life we learn that to appreciate the good, we must know the bad. Yes. I believe this. BUT where is it written that every good deed, good day, good moment must be followed by a bad one? It’s not written anywhere. It’s all made up.

Go live like a child and start feeling the joy of just being who you truly are!

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